Posts Tagged "work longer"

The Bridge to a Larger Social Security Check

Retirees who postpone collecting Social Security from age 62 to 66 – the full retirement age for most baby boomers – get around a third more in their monthly checks. Delaying to 70 increases it even more.

There’s one problem with this strategy. Many people want to retire well before they turn 66.

But there is an alternative for people with 401(k) savings: retire but don’t sign up for Social Security and withdraw an amount from the 401(k) equivalent to the Social Security check. Then delay Social Security for a few years. The start date will, of course, depend on how much money is in savings and how much of it the retiree can spend comfortably.

In a recent experiment, this idea appealed to a substantial minority of older workers who were made aware they could create this so-called “bridge” to a larger Social Security check.

The researchers randomly assigned the workers – all between 50 and 65 – to one of four groups. Each group was presented with the same choice of whether to use the bridge strategy but the choice was described differently. Regardless of the description, the share of participants willing to consider the strategy fell within a range of 27 percent to 35 percent.

This level of interest is “noteworthy,” given that “the survey is likely the first time the respondents would have encountered the idea of drawing down their 401(k)s to postpone claiming Social Security,” said the researchers at the Center for Retirement Research. …Learn More

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Retirement Ages Geared to Life Expectancy

For most of the 20th century, life expectancy was on the rise. Yet older Americans were retiring at younger and younger ages. That changed in the 1990s. Life expectancy continued to rise, but retirement ages started increasing too.

Many significant developments are behind the dramatic shift in retirement habits, including the decline of private-sector pensions, changing attitudes about working women, and bigger financial incentives from Social Security for people who remain in the labor force in order to get a larger monthly check when they finally retire.

Given all of these changes, Urban Institute researchers wondered whether the dramatic longevity gains experienced by the people who make it to their 50s and 60s could be counted as another reason for the delayed retirement trend.

Their evidence suggests that growing lifespans are keeping men over age 55 in the labor force longer and postponing their retirement, particularly in areas with strong job markets and more opportunity.

But women’s behavior was much more nuanced. Their labor force participation also increased, but only for women under 65 and to a much smaller extent than men. For the oldest women in the study – ages 65 to 74 – the results were puzzling to the researchers because labor force participation actually declined with life expectancy for those in the bottom half of the income distribution. …Learn More