Boomers May Stop Work Because They Can

Baby boomers who’ve left the labor force in their pre-retirement years are in better financial shape than they once were.

The wealth of non-working Americans between ages 55 and 61 increased from $83,000 in 1992 to $98,000 in 2008, according to new research from the Urban Institute in Washington.  (Comparisons are in constant dollars.)

Potential explanations for this trend range from greater U.S. inequality that launched more boomers into the top wealth tier to a rise in the numbers of married men who don’t work – but have wives who do.

Barbara Butrica, a senior research associate at the Urban Institute, said her study did not look into the “why” for the emerging group of voluntary non-workers who are approaching traditional retirement ages, married and single men in particular.  One possibility, she said, is that “they are leaving the labor force because they can afford to.” …Learn More

Read That Social Security Statement!

This week, the federal government put every worker’s Social Security statement online. But while most people look at their statements, research shows that more than one in three misses this major point: the longer one waits to file, the larger the monthly retirement check will be.

We’re talking big numbers: someone eligible to receive $1,000 a month at the popular retirement age of 62 can get $1,333 by waiting until 66 and $1,760 by waiting until 70. Of course, one’s health, financial resources, and life events may make filing later difficult or impossible. But getting the information is critical to making a smart decision, which plays a major role in one’s financial well-being in retirement.

The Social Security Administration (SSA) put the statements online after creating a minor news flap last year when it stopped sending them via snail mail to workers. In February, SSA resumed the mailings to Americans age 60 and older. (Full disclosure: SSA funds this blog through the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College.)

Back to the point: The statements are now easily available on ssa.gov to individuals willing to provide some personal data – the site verifies the personal data they enter online against information held by the credit scoring company, Experian.

Here are a few other things about Social Security that might surprise you. According to various research papers that seek to understand how Americans view their benefits: …Learn More

Academics Question Stock Investing

The Standard & Poor’s 500 index has soared 27 percent since October! These times of strong market gains are the brass ring for a large swath of well-educated, well-off Americans.

But recent academic research on three topics – value investing, the record of individual investors, and the usefulness of investment advisers – raises serious questions about buying individual stocks or actively invested stock funds.

The upshot of this research, it seems, was neatly summed up by Nobel Prize-winning economist Daniel Kahneman’s bestseller, “Thinking, Fast and Slow:” stock picking “is more like rolling the dice than like playing poker.”

The papers are complex (though not difficult to read), so here are synopses and links to them: …Learn More

Father and son cooking together

The Family That Dines Together…

New research adds a dash of spice to our understanding of how people handle their personal financial matters: families who dine together grow wealthy together.

Three professors at the University of Georgia have discovered that families who commit to gather regularly around the dinner table – or, presumably, dine out or cook together – are better prepared financially and will accumulate more wealth faster.

As with any statistical analysis, their research can’t prove cause and effect.  Is it that dining together causes wealth to go up, or is that families who know how to handle their finances also tend to be the type of people who enjoy meals together?…Learn More

Readers Express Views on Research

Squared Away readers responded strongly to a recent post, “For Elderly, Little Left as Life Ends.” New research showed that half of the elderly living alone and one-third of couples have less than $10,000 left in savings in the years before they leave this world.

A comment that came in from Susan Weiner, a Boston-area chartered financial analyst, said, “This study is disturbing no matter how you read it.”

John Graves added a skeptical note: “As always, it all depends on how you read the statistics. I read this as, ‘nearly 50 percent had more than $50,000 in assets when they died.’ ”

Do you read the glass as half empty or half full? What are the difficulties of making your savings last through all the phases of retirement? To read more comments, click here. Better yet, keep the conversation going by commenting below or on our Facebook page!

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Image of a tax refund check

Extra in Refund Checks Spurs Savings

A breakthrough experiment determined that some low-income tax filers are willing to save part of their IRS refund after all.

What separates savers from non-savers is each individual’s own “mental accounting.” What specifically influences them is whether their refunds exceeded their anticipation.

The research found that 7 percent of all low-income filers saved part of their refunds. But 12 percent of people who got more than they’d anticipated agreed to save – they did so by opening a savings account or buying a US savings bond or certificate of deposit. Only 4.5 percent of those who got the same as, or less than, anticipated, saved part of it.

“At tax sites, most people don’t save,” said Michael Collins, director of the Center for Financial Security at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. “But if you target the right people you might find some savers.” His research controlled for income, demographics and the refund amount. …Learn More

For Many Elderly, Little Left as Life Ends

About half of the elderly living alone and one-third of elderly couples have less than $10,000  left in their savings and investment accounts just before they leave this world.

These grim statistics may be a more accurate gauge of retirement survival than the balances Americans have accumulated as they enter retirement, a pursuit that pre-retirees and the financial-services industry tend to focus on.

To determine where retirees wind up financially, economists James Poterba at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Steven Venti at Dartmouth College, and David Wise at Harvard University crunched a mass of data.  Tracking a nationally representative sample of middle-aged and older Americans, they tabulated the financial assets held by elderly couples and the elderly living alone as they approached retirement, retired and aged, and when they were last observed in the sample.

“What we take away from this is that a significant number of households have a very small cushion if they encounter any kind of financial need,” Poterba said in a telephone interview last week, referring to a new working paper, “Were They Prepared for Retirement? Financial Status at Advanced Ages in the HRS and AHEAD Cohorts.”

The following is a small slice of what the researchers found in the last years before the elderly died…Learn More

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