August 2022

People Can Spot a Scam After Seeing Fakes

The old and the young are most susceptible to scammers using fake identities to extract money from their victims. People in their 50s who went to college are in the sweet spot and are much better at resisting them.

The question is how to prevent the vulnerable from falling prey to imposter scams, which account for a third of the dollars Americans report to the FTC they’ve lost in frauds every year. A new study finds that exposing people to a watered-down version of a scam they might see in the real world teaches them to recognize an actual scam that comes across the transom.

In the imposter scams that are the focus of this study, someone pretends to represent a trusted organization like the Social Security Administration, the Red Cross, or online retailer Amazon. The goal is to coax either money out of the victim or personal information that can be used to make money. Imposters arrive in many forms – phone calls, emails, or texts.

To educate the 1,000-plus people recruited to this study, the researchers assigned them to one of four different online training programs. The only training that worked was designed to effectively inoculate the participants against fraud by exposing them to simulated scams on an email platform.

After reading each email, they were asked to decide whether it was a fraudulent appeal under the guise of a trusted organization or a copy of a legitimate communication from the organization. To figure this out, they could inspect the source of the email or click on links.

One example of a legitimate Social Security email was “Need a replacement card?” One of the frauds that came from socialsecurity.org – the agency’s actual website is ssa.gov – asked the email’s recipient to “review your Social Security statement.” …Learn More

ACA Policyholders May Dodge a Bullet

It looks like some 13 million people who buy their health insurance on the state and federal exchanges may not see large hikes in their premiums next year after all.

The more generous premium subsidies for Affordable Care Act (ACA) policyholders approved in 2021 under the American Rescue Plan for COVID relief are set to expire at the end of this year. There have been months of uncertainty over whether Congress could pass a bill to continue the subsidies.

But The Washington Post reports that the House and Senate are on a path to agreeing to extend them for three more years, along with allowing Medicare to negotiate the prices of some prescription drugs.

Last year, the American Rescue Plan enhanced the ACA’s original subsidies by capping insurance premiums at 8.5 percent of a worker’s income for 2021 and 2022. If the caps are renewed, ACA policyholders would also avoid the “double whammy” of insurance companies’ 2023 premium hikes, which they have started submitting to their state insurance regulators.

The prospect of an agreement comes months after state insurance commissioners warned lawmakers that the uncertainty around whether the subsidies would continue meant that some insurers would raise 2023 premiums by more than they might have. ACA subsidies make health insurance more affordable to more people, which takes some pressure off of premiums by expanding the pool of customers and reducing insurers’ risk.

Two groups that historically have paid more for health insurance are benefitting the most from a premium cap set at 8.5 percent of income: middle-income workers, who tend to pay a larger percentage of their income for an ACA policy, and older workers, who pay higher premiums because insurers view them as risky.

Before the caps were put in place, workers earning four or more times the federal poverty level did not get any subsidies and paid full price for ACA coverage. Without the assistance, for example, a 40-year-old earning about $51,500 would be paying 20 percent more – or $438 per month instead of the $365 she currently pays, according to the Kaiser Foundation.

Premiums would’ve been 62 percent higher in New York and more than double in Wyoming. …Learn More