Posts Tagged "saving"

Wanna Live Forever, Huh?

Mark Wexler (right), director of the documentary “How to Live Forever,” with fitness celebrity Jack Lalanne.

Immortality hasn’t been this hot since Ponce de Leon searched for the fountain of youth in 16th Century Florida.

The evidence: Captain Jack Sparrow (a.k.a. Johnny Depp) searched high and low for it in “Pirates of the Caribbean” Part IV last summer. Meanwhile, U.S. beaches were littered with the polka dot cover of “Super Sweet Sad Love Story” about a dystopian Manhattan, where longevity had to be earned. Mark Wexler’s documentary, “How to Live Forever,” was a bizarre-funny send up of baby boomers’ search for their fountains of youth. And time – not money – was the currency in the Justin Timberlake vehicle, “In Time.” Another Twilight vampire movie on the way…

This spring, Jane Fonda is promoting her new book, “Prime Time,” about what she calls the “third act” of life as more Americans are increasingly healthy into their 70s, 80s, even 90s. Not to put a damper on things, but can we afford our third act if we’re not Jane Fonda?

Noting the 30-year increase in U.S. longevity over the 20th century, she said it is ushering in a lifestyle “revolution.” But an index produced by the Center for Retirement Research, which funds this blog, indicates that we won’t have enough income to afford it. This regularly updated retirement index shows that nearly half of U.S. households with boomers in their early 50s are “at risk” of not having enough money for retirement.

Are you ready for your glorious third act? Or will it be more like the explorer’s quest? Pure myth.
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New Financial Tools Backed by Research

The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College has created a prototype personal finance website with tools and information on topics ranging from how to reduce spending or refinance a mortgage to the best way to draw down savings during retirement.

The website offers a comprehensive set of tools backed by impartial academic research – not sales pitches.  Individuals can use each calculator, “Learn More” lesson, or “How To” guide individually or as the building blocks for an overall financial plan, which they can construct in a step-by-step process that begins on the homepage.

The website, also called Squared Away, was created by the Financial Security Project (FSP), a financial education initiative of the Center.  It was funded (also like this blog) by the Social Security Administration.

The Center plans to distribute the site through various organizations, such as credit counselors, financial planners, employers, credit unions, and non-profits involved in helping low-income people build up their savings.

The website is still in the “beta” phase and will be improved over the coming months.  We invite readers to try out the tools and comment on them by clicking “Learn More” below.  All comments – good and bad – are welcome.Learn More

Cold Cash: Cash in a freezer

Americans Put Cold Cash on Ice

More than one in four Americans revealed that they put their “mad money” in the freezer.

The freezer strategy was more popular than socks and mattresses, according to a Marist College survey last month of more than 1,000 people.

More people with college degrees chose the freezer than did non-college graduates. But the second most popular hiding place – socks at 19 percent – was particularly popular in the Northeast where people own a lot of socks. Third was the proverbial mattress, and more men than women went this route. Wisely, 17 percent knew of “no good place” in the house to hide their mad money.

Several years ago, I put my credit card in a plastic deli container, filled it with water, and froze it. Just once, I was thinking, it’d be nice to get an American Express bill that didn’t break the $500 barrier. (My barrier is higher now.)

I didn’t admit this to anyone at the time, but maybe it’s alright to talk about our quirky financial habits. Apparently, many of us have them.

Unfortunately, Marist did not ask how much this mad money amounts to. Presumably we’re not talking about thousands. Are we? Squared Away readers, where do you put your mad money, if you have any?Learn More

Graduating in Era of Low Opportunity

Philip Seymour Hoffman playing the washed-up salesman, Willy Loman, in “Death of a Salesman,” is all the rage on Broadway. But when I saw the play recently, it was Biff who got me thinking about young adults today.

In the Arthur Miller classic, Willy anguishes over son Biff’s failure to hold down a job in the city. But the irony is that Biff, played by Andrew Garfield, probably did very well for himself after leaving Brooklyn for Texas. I imagine he became an oil baron or wound up owning substantial real estate in downtown Houston.

Young people graduating from high school or college today don’t have the virtually unlimited opportunity that existed in the 1940s when Miller wrote the play: the personal drive to find a job and establish a career is not enough anymore. Young graduates who sign up for unpaid internships and double up on college degrees are well aware of this.

Last year, 54 percent of adults ages 18 to 24 were employed – that was the lowest level since the government started tracking the data, in 1948 – according to a February report by the Pew Research Center. Despite an improving job market, it was only 55 percent in March. Job creation – 115,000 were added in April – is below the pace that will open up meaningful opportunity for young people. …Learn More

I’ll Save More – Just Not Today Please

We know that not enough Americans save for retirement. Behavioral finance professor Shlomo Benartzi devised a way to fix it – quite awhile ago, in fact.

To ease the pain of saving money, Benartzi and economist Richard Thaler designed a now-famous program in which employees can commit to increase their 401(k)s savings when they get a raise.

Saving is painful because it requires sacrifice, but committing to save money that one doesn’t yet have synchs with human psychology. In 1998, Benartzi and Thaler tested their theory on blue-collar workers in a Midwestern manufacturing plant, and it worked.

The key to saving, Benartzi said, is “embarrassingly simple but extremely powerful.”

The finding was nothing short of ginormous, though employer adoption has been modest. David Wray, president of the Plan Sponsor Council of America, estimated that about 10 percent of U.S. employees with 401(k) plans at work have automatic savings increases, typically at raise time. It’s much more common among mega-employers, he said.

If you’ve heard about behavioral economics but haven’t had time to learn what it’s really about, this 15-minute TED video in which Benartzi explains is an excellent start.

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Readers Express Views on Research

Squared Away readers responded strongly to a recent post, “For Elderly, Little Left as Life Ends.” New research showed that half of the elderly living alone and one-third of couples have less than $10,000 left in savings in the years before they leave this world.

A comment that came in from Susan Weiner, a Boston-area chartered financial analyst, said, “This study is disturbing no matter how you read it.”

John Graves added a skeptical note: “As always, it all depends on how you read the statistics. I read this as, ‘nearly 50 percent had more than $50,000 in assets when they died.’ ”

Do you read the glass as half empty or half full? What are the difficulties of making your savings last through all the phases of retirement? To read more comments, click here. Better yet, keep the conversation going by commenting below or on our Facebook page!

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Bosworth: Why It’s Hard to Save


In this video, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution talks about his latest book and offers a clear-sighted explanation for complex macro-economic forces that shape all Americans’ saving habits and financial security.

Starting in the early 1980s, stock markets boomed and housing prices increased year after year, and Americans “thought they were getting rich,” explains economist Barry Bosworth. “So they thought, ‘Let’s spend a little bit of it.’ “

Billions of dollars of wealth vanished in the 2008 financial market collapse, marking what may be the end of a golden era of wealth formation and undermining plans laid by workers and retirees, he said. Bosworth’s book was released last month: “A Decline in Saving: A Threat to America’s Prosperity.”

Full disclosure: The book incorporates research funded by the U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) through the Retirement Research Consortium, which also funds this blog. The opinions and conclusions expressed are solely those of the blog’s author and do not represent the opinions or policy of SSA or any agency of the federal government.

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