Posts Tagged "retirement"

Less Smoking Trumps More Obesity

Smoking cigarette

Since the 1950s and 1960s, the number of cigarettes smoked in the United States has plummeted by one-half but the number of obese Americans has tripled.

So which megatrend has a greater impact on U.S. health and life expectancy? Remarkably, the winner is the positive effect of the decline in smoking. And the additional longevity, as fewer Americans light up, will continue to play out at least through 2040, according to new research.

“The advantages of smoking reductions are expected to outweigh the disadvantages of increases in obesity for both sexes,” according to findings by University of Pennsylvania sociologist Samuel Preston and his colleagues at UPenn’s Population Studies Center and at Emory University’s Department of Global Health.

The declining popularity of smoking has driven down deaths due to lung cancer to 18 percent of all U.S. deaths. But currently obesity is nearly running neck and neck, causing 16 percent of all deaths.

“We have a horse race going on,” said Christopher Ruhm of the University of Virginia’s Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy, who commented on Preston’s paper at the Retirement Research Consortium’s conference in Washington earlier this month. “The winner of the horse race is that the smoking effect is going to dominate.” (The Center for Retirement Research, which sponsors this blog, is a consortium member.)

Estimates of longevity, in this particular case, should be viewed with caution. The mortality impact isn’t easy to calculate, Ruhm and Preston said, because many conflicting things are going on at the same time. For example, although obesity is rising, cholesterol-lowering statins and blood pressure medications are reducing the risk that any individual will die from obesity. …Learn More

Out-of-Pocket Medicare Costs Bite Deep

The bite taken out of Social Security checks to pay Medicare premiums and co-payments for doctor visits has more than doubled, from just 7 percent of benefits in 1980 to 15.5 percent currently.

People born on the tail end of the baby boom wave are suddenly waking up to retirement, which is barreling towards them. While many have no idea how Medicare works or how much they will pay for health care, the program’s future has emerged as a key issue in a presidential campaign with competing notions of how best to slow Medicare’s growth to a more sustainable level.

Whatever your political stripe, the costs of retirement health care are rising “significantly,” according to a forthcoming report by the Center for Retirement Research, which sponsors this blog.

Medicare covers a large portion of health costs, but retirees must pay Medicare premiums, which are deducted from their monthly Social Security checks, as well as copayments for doctor visits and other medical services such as some tests. These additional expenses are often, though not always, covered by employer-sponsored or private “Medigap” insurance policies, which smooth out these expenses for retirees…Learn More

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Hard Labor Spells Earlier Retirement

Men with the most physically demanding jobs retire earlier – by choice or due to exhaustion or chronic pain – increasing the financial pressures facing this segment of the workforce once they reach old age.

The retirement age for most Americans continues to float upward as people delay the date so they can sock more money away or boost the eventual size of their Social Security checks. But that’s often not a viable option for people with highly physical jobs, such as the 1,500 Alcoa plant workers in a new study.

The retirement pattern for Alcoa workers studied by the Stanford University School of Medicine suggests that men in manufacturing jobs face a unique set of retirement issues related to the physicality of their work. Most of the workers in Stanford’s 2001-2008 study were employed in aluminum smelters. The study found that men in these demanding jobs retired, on average, at age 60 and six months – a full year earlier than their male Alcoa coworkers with jobs such as floor inspector or shipping clerk.

“Those with heavier jobs retire earlier. Those with more sedentary jobs retire later,” Sepideh Modrek, a Stanford medical school lecturer, said at the recent Retirement Research Consortium conference, where she presented the results of her working paper. [The Center for Retirement Research, which sponsors this blog, is a consortium member.] … Learn More

Social Security Advice That Harms Wives

Most financial advisers give troubling advice to married couples about when to claim their Social Security benefits, advice that can substantially reduce the wife’s income during retirement.

Social Security rules generally make it more beneficial for the higher-earning spouse – usually the husband – to delay signing up for his benefits well past age 62. By delaying, he boosts the size of his monthly Social Security check, automatically increasing his wife’s “survivor benefit” after he dies. This holds true for most couples, whether the wife works or not.

A new survey of U.S. financial advisers provided them with hypothetical couples’ situations and asked how they would advise them on when to start receiving Social Security. For the couple in excellent or average health, only 20 percent recommended “that the man delay claiming as long as possible.” This advice leaves most widows with a substantially smaller monthly benefit for years or even decades.

The survey’s finding demonstrates “the lack of understanding of both the benefits of delaying and the compounding factor it can have on the spouse,” said Lisa Schneider, research director for Greenwald & Associates, a private research firm that conducted the study with researchers at the University of Pennsylvania. …Learn More

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In Session: Retirement Conference

Squared Away is not on vacation: I’m attending the annual Retirement Research Consortium’s conference in Washington D.C.

Follow my tweets @SquaredAwayBC to learn about some of the research findings being presented at the conference. I’ll also be writing blog posts about individual research papers in coming weeks.

Topics being discussed today at the conference include the impact of a decline in smoking on U.S. life expectancy, the personality traits that are associated with being prepared for retirement, and how Social Security policies affect your decisions about when to retire.

To receive email alerts about the week’s blog posts, click here.

There’s also Twitter @SquaredAwayBC, or “Like” us on Facebook!Learn More

Image: decisions: work or retire?

Little Thought Put Into Retirement Date

When to make the break and apply for Social Security benefits is one of the biggest financial decisions an individual will make.  But new research suggests that people may put more thought into buying a car or a mattress.

The goal of a new research study was to determine how people make this critical decision and how to possibly influence them to delay claiming – delaying is often the best thing financially for retirees, since doing so increases their monthly benefits.

But what’s striking is a basic finding of the research.  Individual decisions about the timing of an application to start up Social Security benefits depend simply on the order in which the person thinks about the benefits of his actions: those who first think about the advantages of claiming early – before they consider the advantages of claiming at a later age – prefer to claim early, and vice versa.  That’s it!

This finding, which comes out of the Columbia Business School’s Center for Decision Sciences, complements one survey that found that close to half of all people contemplate their date of retirement for no more than 12 months. …Learn More

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Public Perplexed About Annuities

Sales of annuities are slow, because most retirees simply don’t know how to assess their value, new research concludes.

Many of the nation’s top retirement experts agree that annuities are the best solution for retirees struggling with the best way to invest and spend a lifetime of savings.

Annuities have a singular benefit: they guarantee monthly income, no matter how long the retiree lives – something a savings account can’t always do. This constant, pre-determined stream of income has the added advantage of preventing financial mistakes as the elderly lose cognitive capacity, according to Harvard economist David Laibson. Smart Money magazine has dubbed annuities “dementia insurance.”

Yet sales of fixed and variable annuities have been largely flat over the past decade. This “annuity puzzle” has befuddled the academy for years.

Research by the Financial Literacy Center, a joint effort by George Washington University, the Wharton School, and the Rand Corporation, concluded that most people avoid annuities – they “stick to the status quo” – because they don’t understand how they work.

“How can they make these decisions if they don’t understand what a good decision is?” said a Rand senior economist and one of the paper’s co-authors, Arie Kapteyn. “We have to do something about the fact that people have to make these decisions” about managing their retirement wealth. … Learn More

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