Posts Tagged "psychology"

job candidates

Employer Bias Against Aging Boomers?

joanna_lahey photoThe job market is improving, but more than half of baby boomers surveyed felt age discrimination “prevented them from working as much as they would like.” Squared Away interviewed Joanna Lahey, associate professor at Texas A&M University’s Bush School of Government and Public Service, who says age discrimination is extremely difficult to “prove.”

Many older workers have legitimate complaints about being discriminated against.  But what does the research tell us about how pervasive it is?

Lahey: Before I answer that, let me clarify something.  Older people who are working do well compared to younger workers.  On average, they have more money and stability. It’s the older job seekers whose experiences worry policy makers and researchers.

The bottom line is we really don’t know how pervasive age discrimination is, and there’s a lot of room for more research on this. In one experiment I did, younger workers were 40 percent more likely to be called back for an interview than older workers – but that was only women, and they were applying only for entry-level positions.

Age and experience are correlated with each other, so it’s really hard for researchers to tell if someone’s being discriminated against because of their age or because of some sort of mismatch between older workers’ more extensive experience and the job requirements.

The U.S. unemployment rate was a low 5.5 percent in March.  Doesn’t age discrimination fade when employers are hiring? …Learn More

Procrastinators Are Not Big Savers

The Greek poet Hesiod, circa 700 B.C.

Saving for retirement is a modern-day imperative, but even the ancient Greek poet Hesiod – quoted in a new study – advised us not to tarry:

Do not put off till tomorrow and the day after; for a sluggish worker does not fill his barn.

So what about procrastinators, who place more importance on today’s enjoyment than on preparing for the future?  The new study asked whether people with this personality trait make different decisions about retirement saving than non-procrastinators and found that they do.

Up to one in five people were procrastinators in the study’s data base of more than 155,000 workers at numerous employers.  The researchers identified procrastinators in the sample as the people who waited until the final day of open enrollment to choose their health plan from among their employer options.  (To separate them from employees who intentionally delayed so they could collect enough information, the researchers looked at how often people used various online employee benefit tools – these strategic delayers were very active; procrastinators were not.) …Learn More

Wanna Retire? Find a Purpose

In this video by KUTT-TV in Anchorage, Alaska, Fred Keller and Judy Foster show off their retirement project: they transformed a 1976 pickup truck into an oversized replica of a Radio Flyer wagon they can drive around town.

While a new red wagon isn’t for everyone, it illustrates an important point: retirees need to find ways to remain active. Older people warn that retirement shouldn’t be viewed exclusively as a time to “relax,” a well-deserved break.  People who enter retirement expecting nirvana often find they’re bored stiff, or even depressed, due to an abrupt drop in productivity after decades of working. Retirees also spend a lot of time alone or watching television.

This blog often promotes the benefits of financial health and mental health that come with working longer.  When making financial preparations for retirement, preparation should also include thinking about pursuits such as working on a long-neglected project or hobby, writing a family history, or finding a social group, part-time job, avocation, or volunteer work to add structure and purpose to one’s life.

It took Keller and Foster nearly a year to build their vehicle, KTUU reports. When they took it on the road, they discovered another benefit: talking to the people who invariably ask them about their Radio Flyer is a constant source of fun.Learn More

Woman reaching for food

Hunger: Unspoken Among the Elderly

Retirees in one Orlando-area community sustain a lively conversation about every topic under the Florida sun, a conversation that threads through their rounds of horseshoes, dinner dances at the club house, and senior yoga.

But one subject must be handled with great discretion: hunger.

Judy Cipra knows this, because she and her late husband, Fran Cipra, started, and she continues to operate, Fran’s Pantry to collect money and buy groceries for 18 seniors who struggle financially in the Palm Valley retirement community, where my mother also lives.

“If you call me and you tell me that you need food, I don’t ask any questions,” Cipra said. “You just get it.”

Cipra said people reliant solely on Social Security are often embarrassed to be barely getting by.  Some fill their food gaps with soda crackers and peanut butter, she said.

But hunger among seniors is not uncommon.  About 15 percent of Americans age 60 and older were threatened with hunger in 2012, according to the National Foundation to End Senior Hunger.  And as the baby boom population ages, the number of these “food insecure” seniors is continuing to rise, exposing growing numbers of retirees to health problems and depression stemming from not having enough to eat. …Learn More

Photo of a widow

Widows Face More Financial Adversity

Two times more widows than widowers say their spouse’s death carried significant negative financial consequences during the first year after their loss.

This sharp contrast recurred in numerous financial questions recently posed to widows and widowers by New York Life.  The contrast also seemed to persist across various income levels, in questions revolving around both essential needs and luxuries.  Here’s a sampling of answers given by nearly 900 Americans whose spouses have died sometime in the past decade:

Their answers beg the question: Why the divergence?

One reason is certainly that two-thirds of the widows surveyed reported their income was under $35,000, while a majority of the widowers earned more than that. Adults over age 18 were canvassed, so working women’s lower earnings no doubt contributed to the income and lifestyle disparities.

Pension survivor policies also play a role, since two out of three of the people surveyed were over age 65. …Learn More

trust

Trusting Souls Want Financial Advice

Here’s a conundrum: Americans struggle to save for retirement or reduce their credit card spending.  But only about one out of three seeks help with financial issues.

So what lies at the heart of our decisions about whether and when to seek help?  Trust.

In the video below, Angela Hung, director of the RAND Center for Financial and Economic Decision Making, describes research showing that people who trust financial institutions – the markets, financial services companies, brokers – are also more likely to ask for advice from a financial adviser or similar professional.

Further, Hung’s research found that people who trust the industry are also “more likely to be satisfied with their financial service provider.”  Watch the video for Hung’s explanation of an interesting experiment that explores the circumstances under which people follow the advice once it’s given to them.

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Fraud Comes with Aging, Mental Decline

Sometimes research seems merely to confirm the obvious. One example is a new study showing that the cognitive decline that naturally comes with aging makes a senior more vulnerable to fraud.

This isn’t especially surprising, but it is important. Amid a shortage of solid research about fraud among the elderly, this study provides important insight into how and under what circumstances they are increasingly being taken to the cleaners by scammers.

In their study, Keith Gamble at DePaul University and researchers at the Rush University Medical Center used a survey of older Chicagoans known as the Rush Memory and Aging Project, which contains an unusual amount of information about aging, cognition, and financial fraud.

In addition to measuring changes over time in the cognitive functioning of its participating seniors – mostly women – the annual survey asks if they’ve ever been a victim of fraud.  It also includes six questions designed to get at their susceptibility to fraud – Do they have difficulty ending a phone call? – and two questions asking about their willingness to take undue financial risks.  In this case, the undue risk is whether they’d accept a bet with 50/50 odds that they could either double their annual income or lose 10 percent of that income.

Here are their findings: …Learn More

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