Posts Tagged "fraud"

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Fraud Alert: Nursing Home Residents

An estimated 5 million older Americans are victimized by financial and related abuse every year, and people living in nursing homes and assisted living facilities can be especially vulnerable.

The federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) says identifying financial exploitation is complicated by the fact that those perpetrating the fraud are often individuals the senior believes he or she can trust. Often, they are relatives or friends managing the financial affairs of a senior living in a care facility. …Learn More

Overconfidence Linked to Senior Fraud

The seniors who are most confident of their knowledge about money and investments are also the most likely to fall victim to fraud.

That conclusion, by Chicago researchers at DePaul University and the Rush University Medical Center, is among the first to explain the underlying reason for an alarming trend being detected by law enforcement and financial experts: a rise in fraud committed against an enormous and rapidly aging baby boom generation.

Fraud against the elderly can arise from “that combination of not knowing but thinking you know,” Keith Gamble, an assistant finance professor in DePaul’s Driehaus College of Business, said in an interview in which he explained his new study. “That’s what we call overconfidence,” which he and his co-authors determined was “a risk factor for being victimized by fraud.”

The U.S. incidence of fraud has exploded in recent years. Complaints of financial fraud compiled by the Federal Trade Commission surged more than 60 percent in just three years, to 1.5 million last year.

There is growing concern nationwide that boomers, due to what can be a dangerous combination of cognitive decline and having some money socked away for retirement, are extremely vulnerable to con men peddling financial products that make big promises and deliver nothing – or, worse, rob retirees of money they need to live comfortably or even survive.

Declining cognition is associated with lower financial literacy – that’s nothing new. The concern is that seniors do not recognize the problem, Gamble said. “They are actually more confident in their financial decision-making capabilities. The problem is they don’t have the decision-making ability they once had.”

The Chicago researchers focused on seniors who have not acquired actual dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. Rather, they examined whether fraud could be linked to the cognitive decline that is a natural part of aging. …Learn More