Posts Tagged "baby boomers"

change

Late-Career Job Changes Reduce Stress

Great news for older workers considering a career change – those who’ve done it are happier and less stressed.

People who attempted a career change sometime after turning 45 were surveyed last year by the American Institute for Economic Research (AIER) in Massachusetts.  Whatever the reason for making a change – voluntary or forced – the majority of those who did so felt their results were successful.

These late-career changers need to be put in a larger perspective.  Older workers are much more likely to stay put in a job than are younger people moving up the ladder, and older people also have a tougher time recovering and finding a new full-time job after becoming unemployed.

But when older workers can change their employment, the outcomes are positive.

“I feel like a new person” – 72 percent of job changers agreed with this statement, while 65 percent said their stress levels fell, according to the AIER.  There are also downsides to late-career transitions: a hefty minority of those surveyed advised others taking this path to be open-minded about their working hours and lower compensation, though half of those surveyed said their pay eventually increased in their new jobs.

“If you feel you need a change, then do it,” one survey respondent commented.

This survey provides a fresh take on a comprehensive 2009 AARP-Urban Institute study that reached similar conclusions.  The AARP-Urban study found that many older workers tend to move into less prestigious jobs when they make a change.  For example, managers often take non-management positions, which could partly explain why the share of people who said they felt stressed about their work dropped by almost half after a late-career change, from 65 percent to 36 percent. …Learn More

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Employer Bias Against Aging Boomers?

joanna_lahey photoThe job market is improving, but more than half of baby boomers surveyed felt age discrimination “prevented them from working as much as they would like.” Squared Away interviewed Joanna Lahey, associate professor at Texas A&M University’s Bush School of Government and Public Service, who says age discrimination is extremely difficult to “prove.”

Many older workers have legitimate complaints about being discriminated against.  But what does the research tell us about how pervasive it is?

Lahey: Before I answer that, let me clarify something.  Older people who are working do well compared to younger workers.  On average, they have more money and stability. It’s the older job seekers whose experiences worry policy makers and researchers.

The bottom line is we really don’t know how pervasive age discrimination is, and there’s a lot of room for more research on this. In one experiment I did, younger workers were 40 percent more likely to be called back for an interview than older workers – but that was only women, and they were applying only for entry-level positions.

Age and experience are correlated with each other, so it’s really hard for researchers to tell if someone’s being discriminated against because of their age or because of some sort of mismatch between older workers’ more extensive experience and the job requirements.

The U.S. unemployment rate was a low 5.5 percent in March.  Doesn’t age discrimination fade when employers are hiring? …Learn More

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Kids’ College Trumps Parents’ Retirement

Parents have spoken: paying for college is affecting their retirement planning.

Two new surveys indicate that the surge in college costs is impinging on Americans’ retirement finances.  One survey, by the research firm Hearts & Wallets, found that boomer parents who support their adult children are more likely to delay retirement than parents of financially independent offspring.  The second survey, by the mutual fund manager T. Rowe Price, found that half of parents are willing to delay retirement or dip into their retirement savings to fund college.

college grads chartThe surveys included young, idealistic parents as well as parents staring down the barrel of the retirement gun, and parents whose children achieved financial independence years ago. Nevertheless, these responses consistently show a willingness to trade retirement security to pay for their children’s college education.

The findings aren’t shocking, since parenthood is defined by sacrifice. But financial planners offer some tough advice about parental financial obligations, especially for clients zeroing in on retirement. Parents – as opposed to their offspring – have relatively few years left in the labor force to save for retirement.

“There’s going to be a day when you can’t work anymore,” said Kelley Long, a financial planner with Financial Finesse, which provides independent financial education programs and a financial helpline for U.S. workplaces. …Learn More

Wanna Retire? Find a Purpose

In this video by KUTT-TV in Anchorage, Alaska, Fred Keller and Judy Foster show off their retirement project: they transformed a 1976 pickup truck into an oversized replica of a Radio Flyer wagon they can drive around town.

While a new red wagon isn’t for everyone, it illustrates an important point: retirees need to find ways to remain active. Older people warn that retirement shouldn’t be viewed exclusively as a time to “relax,” a well-deserved break.  People who enter retirement expecting nirvana often find they’re bored stiff, or even depressed, due to an abrupt drop in productivity after decades of working. Retirees also spend a lot of time alone or watching television.

This blog often promotes the benefits of financial health and mental health that come with working longer.  When making financial preparations for retirement, preparation should also include thinking about pursuits such as working on a long-neglected project or hobby, writing a family history, or finding a social group, part-time job, avocation, or volunteer work to add structure and purpose to one’s life.

It took Keller and Foster nearly a year to build their vehicle, KTUU reports. When they took it on the road, they discovered another benefit: talking to the people who invariably ask them about their Radio Flyer is a constant source of fun.Learn More

Ranking: Top Cities for Successful Aging

With snowstorms hammering the eastern United States, some baby boomers may be looking for a permanent escape when they retire.

Yet Southern cities did not come out on top in the Milken Institute’s new ranking of the Best Cities for Successful Aging, a ranking based on a fairly comprehensive set of factors important to seniors. Take frigid Iowa City, the No. 1 small city: it gets credit for its transportation and the affordability of its assisted living and adult day care services.

Map mockup

Milken Institute economist Anusuya Chatterjee saw common themes among the top-ranked metro areas.   They tended to have vibrant economies, quality healthcare services, opportunities for intellectual stimulation and active lifestyles, and easy access to amenities like grocery stores, transit, and culture.

University towns often fill these requirements, she said.  Madison, Wisconsin – home of the University of Wisconsin – was the top-ranked large metropolitan area.

Financial considerations also influenced the rankings, such as living costs and the cost of day services for the elderly or assisted living. Convenience amenities have financial implications too – a monthly subway pass is cheaper than owning a car.

The methodology, explained in more detail later, was more rigorous than what’s typically found in city rankings.  Here are other surprising results: …Learn More

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Breaking Up (the Pension) Is Hard to Do

In a divorce, splitting up the pension is trickier than dividing the house.

Divorcing couples and their advisers “who aren’t hip to divorce splitting of retirement plan assets often do it improperly,” said Howard Phillips, a Delray Beach, Florida, actuary and author of “Dividing Retirement Plan Assets in a Divorce.”  He knows, because he values pensions for couples negotiating their divorce settlements and then drafts the order that will be entered into the court.

Dividing a house is easy.  Two realtors pouring over sales of comparable nearby properties can readily agree on a value – once the house is sold, the parties pay the realtor and split the proceeds.  But a pension plan’s value greatly depends on how and when it’s counted and the method used to allocate that value between the spouses.

Phillips explained the basics of how defined benefit plans and defined contribution plans – 401(k)s, 403(b)s, and IRAs – may be handled in a divorce during a recent podcast for the Retirement Income Industry Association.  The following methods for splitting a pension 50/50 have strikingly different outcomes for the participant in the pension plan and for his or her former spouse:

Defined contribution plans:

  • Tracing assets: If one spouse comes to the marriage with $50,000 in a 10-year-old 401(k) account, only contributions made during the marriage – and investment returns on the new contributions – are divided.  If the plan now has $150,000, the amount that’s divided up can vary widely – or it can be zero if no new contributions were made during the marriage. The remaining balance goes to the spouse who started the 401(k) account. …
  • Learn More

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Winging It in Retirement?

Saving should be the centerpiece of any retirement plan today.  But a new survey indicates that many Americans on the cusp of retiring have given little thought to the other key issues they’ll face in retirement.

A majority of older Americans recently surveyed by the American College of Financial Services, an educational organization for financial professionals, said they have set a goal for how much money to save to “live comfortably” as retirees.  And, when asked to assess their own progress, they feel they’re doing a good job of it.  Granted, the survey was limited to a select group of about 1,000 people over age 60, all of whom have at least $100,000 in investable assets.

But the financial risks posed by the transition away from full-time work and a regular paycheck are complex and continual – and preparing for them goes well beyond contributing to a 401(k).

Only a minority of people planning their retirement take into account these important financial issues: …Learn More

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