Retirees: Focus on the Monthly Check

To help retirees choose the best way to spend down the 401(k) savings they have built up over a lifetime, Nobel Prize laureate William Sharpe urged them to focus on a single outcome: the size of their monthly check.


This video was created by Professor William Sharpe of Stanford University.

Financial advisors should say to their clients, “Don’t worry about the strategy or model. Look at the outcomes that matter: what you can spend year by year in retirement,” he said.

Speaking at a conference this week at Boston University’s School of Management, which brought financial practitioners together with top minds in academic finance and Washington think tanks, Sharpe said advisors should present clients with various payout schedules and then explain the probability of success for each one they’re considering. Learn More

A cartoon child holding money standing below the title: I Got Bank! What my grandad taught me about money.

Kids’ Book Teaches Bankable Lessons

Young readers have given a thumbs-up to the new children’s book, “I Got Bank!”

The book is about 10-year-old Jazz Elliott, who follows the frugality lesson his late granddad taught him: he has saved $2,000 in a bank account.

class

Beverly Moss’ after-school reading of “I Got Bank!” The students, counter-clockwise, are: Jaida, Saba, Kevin, Ellen, Anthony, Yaovi, Jepherson, Carlos, and Kent.

On Friday afternoons in May, eight- to 12-year-olds take turns reading the book aloud during the after-school program at the Mission Park Apartments in Boston. It elicits all kinds of discussion.

One of the readers, Ellen, had a Eureka moment after librarian Beverly Moss explains how regular savings accounts work.

“Oh, that’s an interest rate!” Ellen said.

The book’s author, Teri Williams, is also president of a bank that is giving away free copies of “I Got Bank!” to grade schools and after-school programs. Williams, who grew up in a low-income housing project in Bridgeport, Connecticut, said she wrote the book to help children who have similar backgrounds start learning financial skills. …Learn More

Conference Will Guide Financial Advisors

At a dinner next Monday night, finance professor Zvi Bodie at Boston University and his co-hosts will kick off their third conference geared toward educating financial professionals about cutting-edge thinking in the field. “The Future of Life Cycle Saving and Investing” will focus on serving low-income individuals. However, Bodie said in this recent interview that the conference lessons apply to all financial consumers.

Zvi BodieSQUARED AWAY: Is this an annual conference?
BODIE: No. The first one was in 2006, the second in 2008. Truthfully, what inspired me to have these conferences, among other things, was the strong support of MIT economics professor Paul Samuelson. I decided I was sick of the baloney about personal investing that is served up on websites, brochures, etc. – all of which is designed for the benefit of the service providers rather than the customers. So much of it flatly contradicts what I teach. We’re dedicating the dinner to the memory of Paul Samuelson, who died last year.

SQUARED AWAY: What baloney?
BODIE: Say you’re a beginning investor. You go to any website – go to investor.gov. It’s a really nice looking website. This is the Securities and Exchange Commission, so you’d think, ‘Wow, I can trust this.’ But, actually, all this material was fed to the government by the investment industry. …
Learn More

A woman wearing a backpack sitting on a grassy hill.

College Debt’s Impact is Growing

Forty percent of college graduates today have difficulty repaying their student loans, but few realize how many options they have to get relief by renegotiating them.

The non-profit American Student Assistance (ASA) counsels students on how to deal with onerous loan payments. When students call ASA, repayment counselors tell them their options include extending the life of the loan, which reduces the monthly payments, or making graduated payments, which increase as their paycheck increases in future years.

Some borrowers may even be able to qualify for postponing payments or canceling some of their debts.

Borrowing on college campuses has reached crisis proportions, according to ASA. Total student loans outstanding have surpassed the $900 billion mark. Rising tuitions and stagnating household incomes due to the recession have only increased American families’ reliance on debt to fund college. …Learn More

Tipped over jar of change.

5 Tools to Control Spending

Financial planners say poor spending habits are their biggest obstacle to helping clients.
So I asked a dozen financial planners around the country – all members of the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors (NAPFA) – to share their best tools and tips.

This week I’ll provide the five “best” tools and the reason planners like them. Next, I’ll post planners’ top five motivational tips. …Learn More

...10...1617181920